About

Christopher S. Rose is a social historian of medicine, focusing on the nineteenth and twentieth century Middle East. He earned his doctorate in History from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) in 2019.

He is currently an independent scholar based in Austin, Texas. He has taught as a contingent faculty member for six semesters in the School of Behavioral and Social Sciences at Saint Edward’s University in Austin, Texas. He has also taught for the Departments of History and Middle Eastern Studies at the University of Texas. He is a postdoctoral fellow with the Institute for Historical Studies at UT for the 2019-20 year. Prior to pursuing his doctorate, he acquired nearly two decades of administrative experience at the University of Texas.

His monograph project, tentatively titled Home Front Egypt: Famine, Disease, and Death during the Great War, describes how price control systems intended to ensure an adequate supply of food for the Egyptian population during the World War I (1914-1918) were neutralized by requisitions of labor and foodstuffs, a situation that resulted in inflation, food shortages, and starvation among civilians. Using demographic and statistical data, he argues that malnutrition facilitated the rapid spread of disease throughout the country, killing more people than military action. The ‘Spanish’ influenza pandemic alone claimed over 150,000 lives — over one percent of Egypt’s population — in the last two months of 1918 (an article about the pandemic in Egypt is forthcoming in the Journal of World History).

He is exploring the broader global colonial experience of the First World War for a second project. His other research interests include the formative period of Islam from Muhammad until the rise of the Umayyads; the history and development of Fustat/Cairo; Islamic North Africa and Spain (al-Andalus); and the spread of cultural traits outward from the Middle East through trade networks (Silk Route, Mediterranean, Atlantic).

Dr. Rose is active as a public historian. He is a cohost of the New Books in Middle Eastern Studies channel, part of the New Books podcast network. He was also a founding co-host of the podcast 15 Minute History for eight years, and is currently immediate past-president (2018 – 2022) of the Middle East Outreach Council. Chris also has significant experience in educator training, particularly working with world history and world geography educators. He has conducted numerous professional development sessions for educators, co-written several curriculum units for K-12 classrooms, and escorted numerous groups of educators to the Middle East.

Education

Ph.D., History, 2019
The University of Texas at Austin

Dissertation: On the Home Front: Food, Medicine, and Disease in World War I Egypt
Supervisor: Yoav Di-Capua

M.A., Middle Eastern Studies, 2000
The University of Texas at Austin

B.A., International Studies, December 1996
The American University, Washington, DC

Other Publications

Published Work and Works in Production

  • The History of Public Health in the Middle East: The Medical-Environmental Turn,” History Compass. April 27, 2021. DOI: 10.1111/hic3.12659.

  • “Implications of the Spanish Influenza Pandemic (1918-1920) for the History of Early 20th Century Egypt,” Journal of World History (32:4, September 2021).

  • “Food, Hunger, and Rebellion: Egypt in World War I and its Aftermath,” in Justin Nordstrom, ed., The Provisions of War: Expanding the Boundaries of Food and Conflict, 1840-1990, Fayetteville: University of Arkansas Press (in production), chapter 9.


Reviews:

Public History Writing:

Projects

The Grad School Survival Guide

Starting in the summer of 2019, I began a post-dissertation brain dump of all the things I wish I had known when I started graduate school (either time). Like most graduate programs, I was supplied with a student manual. It told me how to register, who to talk to about what, where the library was, and all sorts of practical information … but in retrospect, the manual I really needed didn’t exist.

What skills do you need to be successful in graduate school?

Now, this isn’t a one-sized fits all. I encourage you often to get lots of advice, and then adapt it to your particular working style. If it doesn’t work for you, then by all means … ignore it! I was a non-traditional student (I frequently got to play “dad” in class, and let’s never mention that seminar I took with a professor who was markedly younger than me); working full time up until I started my dissertation research, and I had to learn how to navigate quickly and efficiently lest I become overwhelmed and burned out.

Just because you’re none of these things … well, quick and efficient is valuable for everyone!

Memberships


  • American Historical Association

  • Fulbright Association

  • Middle East Outreach Council

  • Middle East Studies Association

Christopher S. Rose

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