• Open access (OA) has been a force for change in the dissemination of scholarly research. However, movement towards this form of publishing has varied between disciplines as, for example, research concerning law is somewhat behind the natural and social sciences (Severin, Egger, Eve, and Hürlimann, 2018). OA resources can be defined as “digital, online, free of charge, and free of most copyright and licensing restrictions” (Suber, 2012, p. 4). They can be published as gold or green. The former is funded by an article processing charge (APC) and allows for immediate publication, popularly in journals, and the latter becomes available after an embargo period, regularly through repositories, with no cost to the author or reader (Springer Nature, 2021). This essay will examine how the rise in OA legal research has impacted publishers and library and information services. To understand this change, the evolution of OA in general and within the legal sector needs to be understood. It is then important to analyse issues with the traditional dissemination of legal research and how a move towards OA can have major benefits. Further, key developments towards an OA future have been made which will demonstrate how publishers and library and information services are being impacted by this shift.