This group wants to support women (including trans women) scholars who study Chinese Religions. All are welcome, from senior scholars who would like to share their experiences in the field, to junior scholars, including graduate students, who wish to discuss issues of gender and diversity in their own career developments. This is an open-ended conversation aiming at bringing women scholars together to discuss issues that matter to us all, and to offer informal mentoring for younger generations. We hope to continue to build and maintain a resilient community.

Grant writing and grant opportunities – 2020 meeting

1 reply, 2 voices Last updated by Stephanie Wong 11 months, 3 weeks ago
Viewing 1 reply thread
  • Author
    Posts
    • #52145

      Elena Valussi
      Participant
      @evalussi

      Elena Valussi:  Suggestions for grant writing – A few thoughts from today’s discussion

      Know your audience and modify your writing with that in mind.
      Be specific, concrete, and clear. Your proposal will be read by specialists in your field (whom you want to impress), but also probably also non-specialists, for whom it is important to understand your project and relate to it.
      Make sure you explain very well why your project matters, in your field and outside it.
      Demonstrate that this project is achievable and explain how you will achieve it. Participate in fellowship writing workshops offered by your university or other institutions.
      Seek feedback from colleagues or mentors. Choose your letter writers carefully, with this in mind: do they know and respect your work? Can they explain on your behalf why your project is worth funding? If it does not work the first time, it may work the second time. Try again, the pool of applicants and the evaluators might be very different. Don’t be discouraged. If co-writing a grant proposal, seek people who can share the work, and who are equally invested in the project. Seek small grants at AAR, AAS, AHA, and other organizations. Seek out small granting institutions. Seek internal grants from your own university. This will give you practice, will give you some funding, and will build your CV.

      Natasha Heller:  These are the links shared in the chat this morning:

      https://www.asianetwork.org/programs/

      SSSR https://sssreligion.org/awards-grants/jack-shand-research-grants/

      SSSR student research grants
      https://sssreligion.org/awards-grants/student-research-grants/

      ASR (Association of Sociology of Religion) grants

      https://www.sociologyofreligion.com/lectures-papers/

      A great Chinese studies grant:
      Luce/ACLS https://www.acls.org/programs/china-studies/

      A great early to middle career fellowship: Institute for Advanced Study, School of Social Sciences & School of Historical Study
      https://www.ias.edu/

      CEIB  http://www.inalco.fr/actualite/ceib-nouveau-centre-recherche-inalco


      More grant giving organizations mentioned:

      AAS
      AAR
      AHA

      Tang Studies society: http://tangstudies.org/Home.html
      NEH: https://www.neh.gov/grants
      Mellon: https://mellon.org/grants/
      Templeton (as far as I know you need to be invited to apply  – a bit mysterious)
      CCK: http://www.cckf.org/en/about

      • This topic was modified 11 months, 3 weeks ago by Elena Valussi.
      • This topic was modified 11 months, 3 weeks ago by Elena Valussi.
    • #52259

      Stephanie Wong
      Participant
      @stephaniemwong

      Thanks for sharing all this!

Viewing 1 reply thread
  • Only members can participate in this group's discussions.