This is a scholarly working group for individuals interested in the life and works of composer Julia Perry. The goals of this group are to assist with the exchange of manuscripts, published works, and scholarship on Perry, as well as providing support for other members including offering feedback on projects; assisting with obtaining materials from libraries, archives, and similar institutions; and creating and updating bibliographies, discographies, lists of performances, works lists, and other such reference materials on Perry with information gleaned through individual research.

Rights

3 replies, 2 voices Last updated by Kendra Leonard 11 months, 2 weeks ago
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    • #44782

      Kendra Leonard
      Participant
      @kleonard74

      I’ve been getting a lot of questions about who holds the rights to Perry’s music. Here’s what I wrote to one correspondent, but would love input from people more familiar with copyright and similar issues:

      The copyright issues surrounding Perry’s works are complicated. Perry allowed mainstream music publishers to publish a number of her pieces; others were published much later by the Southern Music Press; many of these are no longer listed in those companies’ catalogues. Carl Fischer does still retain the rights to a few of Perry’s works, as listed on their site, and I think Hildegard Press has a couple of her pieces listed as well. I wouldn’t tread on those.

      But others have never been published. In her chapter on Perry in From Spirituals to Symphonies, Helen Walker-Hill lists a Lucie Perry Bigbie as Perry’s legal representative and the person to whom copyright would belong, but I have not been able to find any information about Bigbie, much less a means of contacting her. Technically this makes Perry’s works “orphan works.” However, her music can also be categorized as “fair use” when it is used for teaching, research, and nonprofit enterprises, as well as in “transformative” ways. This means, at least as far as I can tell, that you could make new editions or arrangements of Perry’s work, but cannot sell them (as sheet music or recordings) or perform them for profit. So you could create new editions and share them for free, and perform the music in contexts in which no one is making a profit from the performance. I would make sure that in any edition or arrangements you make that you include a Creative Commons license for it, marking it as NonCommercial. This tool helps you choose the best license for whatever you produce: https://creativecommons.org/share-your-work/.

      Corrections? Thoughts?

    • #52282

      Jon Silpayamanant
      Participant
      @jonsilpayamanant

      I’ve come across one reference to an alternate spelling that gets a few web hits: “Lucie Perry Bigby” is in the collected papers of Helen Walker Hill (pg. 112), an entry in the Copyright Encyclopedia, and an OCR text from a 1954 newspaper. I’ve been trying other spelling combinations (e.g. “Lucy,” “Bigbee,” etc.) but not having much luck.

      • #52283

        Kendra Leonard
        Participant
        @kleonard74

        Thanks, Jon. I am not very hopeful about finding a legal heir for Perry at this point.

    • #56631

      Kendra Leonard
      Participant
      @kleonard74

      Hello friends–I received an email this morning from Jay Berger of Carl Fischer, who asked for me to remove the copies of Perry’s Violin Concerto, for which the full score and the piano reduction are currently available on this site. I have asked him how I should go about asking for permission to continue to host these files here, especially considering that they are manuscript files for research purposes. I will let you know how this proceeds.

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