This reading group accompanies the Post-Publishing research theme at the Centre for Postdigital Cultures. In response to the ongoing enclosure of knowledge infrastructures and services, we will discuss ways to reimagine the relationalities of academic publishing and how to experiment with open, not-for-profit, community-led models based on care and custodianship instead. This reading group is open for all to join.
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Our website with more information on the readings and practicalities: https://cmkp.hcommons.org/
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Annotation via hypothes.is? Use https://via.hypothes.is/ and paste the link of your document in there – easy as pie 🙂
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Zotero reading group library: https://www.zotero.org/groups/2529654/commoning_the_means_of_knowledge_production
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Virtual meeting room at: http://webinar.coventry.ac.uk/cpc-reading-groups/ (Username of your choice, password: CPCReading20 )

Files List

  • Constant, CC4r  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 22 November 2022.

    Constant, ‘CC4r * Collective Conditions for Re-Use’, 6 October 2020.

  • Jara Rocha and Seda Gürses, ‘A Catalog of Formats for Digital Discomfort’  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 22 November 2022.

    Jara Rocha and Seda Gürses, ‘A Catalog of Formats for Digital Discomfort’ (The Institute for Technology in The Public Interest/Digital Life Initiative, 2021). Constant, ‘CC4r * Collective Conditions for Re-Use’, 6 October 2020, https://constantvzw.org/wefts/cc4r.en.html.

  • Rita Raley, Tactical Media (Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2009).  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 17 October 2022.

    Tactical media describes interventionist media art practices that engage and critique the dominant political and economic order. Rather than taking to the streets and staging spectacular protests, the practitioners of tactical media engage in an aesthetic politics of disruption, intervention, and education. From They Rule, an interactive map of the myriad connections between the world’s corporate and political elite created by Josh On and Futurefarmers, to Black Shoals, a financial market visualization that is intended to be both aesthetically and politically disruptive, they embrace a broad range of oppositional practices. In Tactical Media, Rita Raley provides a critical exploration of the new media art activism that has emerged out of, and in direct response to, postindustrialism and neoliberal globalization. Through close readings of projects by the DoEAT group, the Critical Art Ensemble, Electronic Civil Disobedience, and other tactical media groups, she articulates their divergent methods and goals and locates a virtuosity that is also boldly political. Contemporary models of resistance and dissent, she finds, mimic the decentralized and virtual operations of global capital and the post-9/11 security state to exploit and undermine the system from within. Emphasizing the profound shift from strategy to tactics that informs new media art-activism, Raley assesses the efficacy of its symbolic performances, gamings, visualizations, and hacks. With its cogent analyses of new media art and its social impact, Tactical Media makes a timely and much needed contribution to wider debates about political activism, contemporary art, and digital technology.

  • Jeff Pooley, ‘Surveillance Publishing’.  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 5 May 2022.

    Pooley, J. (2022) ‘Surveillance Publishing’. The Journal of Electronic Publishing [online] 25 (1). available from

  • 'Misleading metrics' and the ecology of scholarly publishing.  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 9 March 2022.

    Kirsten Bell. 2018. 'Misleading metrics' and the ecology of scholarly publishing. In Predatory Publishing. Post Office Press, Rope Press and punctum books, pp. 26-33. https://doi.org/10.17613/M6N58CK3D

  • An Instrument for Adoration: A Mini-Manifesto Against Metrics for the Humanities  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 9 March 2022.

    Eileen A. Fradenburg Joy, “‘An Instrument for Adoration’: A Mini-Manifesto Against Metrics for the Humanities (To Be Elaborated Upon at a Further Date),” in Humane Metrics/Metrics Noir (Coventry: Post Office Press, 2018), pp 26-33. https://hcommons.org/deposits/item/hc:19823/.

  • Number crunching: transforming higher education into ‘performance data’  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 10 February 2022.

    Number crunching: transforming higher education into ‘performance data’

  • Trying to Say ‘No’ to Rankings and Metrics Case Studies from Francophone West Africa, South Africa, Latin America and the Netherlands  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 10 February 2022.

    Trying to Say ‘No’ to Rankings and Metrics
    Case Studies from Francophone West Africa, South Africa, Latin America and the Netherlands

  • Marres and De Rijcke, ‘From Indicators to Indicating Interdisciplinarity'  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 14 January 2022.

    Marres, Noortje, and Sarah de Rijcke. ‘From Indicators to Indicating Interdisciplinarity: A Participatory Mapping Methodology for Research Communities in-the-Making’. Quantitative Science Studies, 29 June 2020, 1041–55.

  • Extract from Sharpe, Christina Elizabeth. 2016. In the Wake: On Blackness and Being. Durham: Duke University Press.  
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 12 November 2021.
  • Love (2010) Truth and Consequences: On Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading  
    Uploaded by Tobias Steiner on 25 August 2021.
  • Sedgwick, E. 1997. ‘Paranoid Reading and Reparative Reading, or, You’re so Paranoid, You Probably Think This Introduction Is about You’.  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Tobias Steiner on 25 August 2021.
  • Zaveri (2020) Gender and Equity in Openness: Forgotten Spaces  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Tobias Steiner on 12 May 2021.
  • Amrute (2019) Of Techno-Ethics and Techno-Affects  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Tobias Steiner on 27 April 2021.

    Amrute, Sareeta ‘Of Techno-Ethics and Techno-Affects’, Feminist Review 123, no. 1 (1 November 2019): 56–73, https://doi.org/10.1177/0141778919879744.

  • Let’s First Get Things Done! On Division of Labour and Techno-Political Practices of Delegation in Times of Crisis  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Tobias Steiner on 9 April 2021.

    Aouragh, Miriyam, Seda Gürses, Jara Rocha, and Femke Snelting. 2015. ‘Let’s First Get Things Done! On Division of Labour and Techno-Political Practices of Delegation in Times of Crisis’. The Fibreculture Journal, no. 26.
    https://doi.org/10.15307/fcj.26.196.2015.

  • ‘Nothing Comes Without Its World: Thinking with Care’  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 12 March 2021.

    Puig de la Bellacasa, Maria (2012) ‘Nothing Comes Without Its World: Thinking with Care’ The Sociological Review
    What is the significance of caring for thinking and knowing? Thinking and knowing are essentially relational processes. Grounded on a relational conception of ontology the essay argues that ‘thinking with care’ is a vital requisite of collective thinking in interdependent worlds, but also one that necessitates a thick vision of caring. A speculative exploration of forms of thinking with care unfolds through a rereading of Donna Haraway's work, specifically of its take on feminist discussions on the situated character of knowledge. The notion of thinking with care is articulated through a series of concrete moves: thinking-with, dissenting-within and thinking-for. While weaving Haraway's thinking and writing practices with the trope of care offers a particular understanding of this author's knowledge politics, the task of caring also appears in a different light.

  • The Politics of Open Access — Decolonizing Research or Corporate Capture?  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 11 February 2021.

    Meagher, K. (2021), Introduction: The Politics of Open Access — Decolonizing Research or Corporate Capture?. Development and Change. https://doi.org/10.1111/dech.12630

    This introductory article looks beyond the conventional framing of open ac-cess (OA) debates in terms of paywalls and copyrights, to examine the his-torical processes, institutional and digital infrastructures, and political dy-namics shaping the effects of OA in development research. From a histori-cal perspective, it focuses on tensions and crises in the relationship betweenscholarly and corporate publishing ecosystems. The spectrum of open accessmodels is also examined, with a focus on green, gold, diamond and black,which tend to obscure the underlying scholarly publishing infrastructuresthat shape the parameters of openness and access. A closer look at distinc-tive for-profit and non-profit OA infrastructures reveals the inequitable andoften neo-colonial effects of for-profit models on Southern researchers andthe social sciences. Accounts of the politics of OA highlight processes ofpolitical capture of the OA agenda by Northern corporate and state interestsand draw attention to alternative interest coalitions which are more suitedto prioritizing the global public good over private profit. Reflecting on therequirements of OA in low-resource environments, this article echoes callsfor more equitable forms of openness and access in development researchecosystems, with a v iew to decolonizing as well as advancing OA.

  • Decolonizing Scholarly Communications through Bibliodiversity  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 11 February 2021.

    Shearer, Kathleen, & Becerril-García, Arianna. (2021, January 7). Decolonizing Scholarly Communications through Bibliodiversity. Zenodo. http://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.4423997

    This short form article was originally accepted to be published in a Special Open Access Collection in the journal, Development and Change, however, was withdrawn by the authors due to unacceptable licensing conditions proposed by the publisher.

    Diversity is an important characteristic of any healthy ecosystem. In the field of scholarly communications, diversity in services and platforms, funding mechanisms and evaluation measures will allow the ecosystem to accommodate the different workflows, languages, publication outputs and research topics that support the needs of different research communities. Diversity also reduces the risk of vendor lock-in, which leads to monopolization and high prices. Yet this ‘bibliodiversity’ is undermined by the fact that researchers around the world are evaluated according to journal-based citation measures, which have become the major currency of academic research. Journals seek to maximize their bibliometric measures by adopting editorial policies that increase citation counts, resulting in the predominance of Northern/Western research priorities and perspectives in the literature, and an increasing marginalization of research topics of more narrow or local nature. This contribution examines the distinctive, non-commercial approach to open access (OA) found in Latin America and reflects on how greater diversity in OA infrastructures helps to address inequalities in global knowledge production as well as knowledge access. The authors argue that bibliodiversity, rather than adoption of standardized models of OA, is central to the development of a more equitable system of knowledge production.

  • The Subalternist Turn in Latin American Postcolonial Studies, or, Thinking in the Wake of What Went Down Yesterday (November 8, 2016)  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 11 January 2021.

    Williams, Gareth. ‘The Subalternist Turn in Latin American Postcolonial Studies, or, Thinking in the Wake of What Went Down Yesterday (November 8, 2016)’. Política Común 10 (2016).

  • Can Open Scholarly Practices Redress Epistemic Injustice?  
    In category: Readings.
    Uploaded by Janneke Adema on 7 December 2020.

    Albornoz, Denise, Angela Okune, and Leslie Chan. ‘Can Open Scholarly Practices Redress Epistemic Injustice?’ In Reassembling Scholarly Communications: Histories, Infrastructures, and Global Politics of Open Access, edited by Martin Paul Eve and Jonathan Gray. The MIT Press, 2020. https://doi.org/10.7551/mitpress/11885.001.0001