• Algerian Women’s Būqālah Poetry: Oral Literature, Cultural Politics, and Anti-Colonial Resistance

    Author(s):
    Susan Slyomovics (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Group(s):
    GS Poetry and Poetics, LLC Arabic, LLC Francophone, TC Anthropology and Literature
    Subject(s):
    Arabic language, Francophone literature, Middle Eastern literature, Poetics
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    npm17
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6W909
    Abstract:
    Būqālah refers both to a ceramic pitcher as well as to poems ritually embedded in the traditional, favorite, divinatory pastime associated with women city dwellers of specific Algerian towns such as Blida,Cherchell, Tlemcen, Constantine, and Algiers. This essay considers the shift from orality to a written archive of French and Algerian collections of būqālah poems by focusing on analyses of Algerian Arabic oral literature as an expression of feminine cultural protest and resistance to the domination of language policies under French colonialism. What are the ways in which an intimate ritual—one linked to orality, the divinatory, women’s poesis, and the Algerian Arabic dialect—begins to carry political meanings during the War of Independence and in post-1962 independent Algeria? Contributing to the circulation and creation of new meanings, forms, and venues for būqālah poetry are Algerian radio and television broadcasts, Internet postings, and the publication of the 1962 French poem “Boqala” by Djamila Amrane.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    8 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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