• Literature and Psychoanalysis: Whose Madness is it anyway?

    Author(s):
    Lorelei Caraman (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    TC Psychology, Psychoanalysis, and Literature
    Subject(s):
    American literature, Literary theory, Literature and psychology
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    21st Century Literature, critic, madness, psychoanalysis, the unconscious
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M63C7H
    Abstract:
    Examiner/examined, analyst/analysand, subject/object, sane/mad, science/art: the relationship between psychoanalysis and literature appears to conform to this binary logic, with the first term in each set clearly privileged over the second. The realm of the literary is populated with an impressive assortment of mad characters and mad authors: killers, junkies, drunkards, the paranoid, the depressed, the suicidal, the abandoned or the simply alienated. Literature inhabits and is inhabited by the pathological, or so it must have seemed to the armies of psychoanalytic critics who repeatedly turned to it. We seek to deconstruct this particular binary view of literature-as-madness, psychoanalysis-as-saneness by showing how a critic’s preoccupation with the pathology of an author can sometimes expose his/her own unconscious complexes, desires or fears. With this in mind, we thus momentarily turn the examiner into the examined.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal Article
    Publisher:
    Editura Universităţii "Alexandru Ioan Cuza" Iaşi
    Journal:
    Acta Iassyensia Comparationis
    Volume:
    1
    Issue:
    17
    Start Page:
    31
    End Page:
    36
    Status:
    Published
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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