• James Joyce’s Priesthood through his Art of Writing

    Author(s):
    Lillian Melendez (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    LLC 19th-Century American
    Subject(s):
    American literature
    Item Type:
    Essay
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6VW2M
    Abstract:
    Dreams are abstract thoughts in one’s mind that can be revealed. Thoughts that are suppressed can be revealed in the subconscious mind. Sigmund Freud views dreams as one views sleep; as an abstract code that can be decoded through actions and through the ‘slip of the tongue.’ The Freudian slip is found in several passages of A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man. When using Freud’s technique, a revelation occurs, suggesting that James Joyce had, indeed, a stabled long profession as a priest, but not in a traditional sense. He used his modernist art form of writing to display religious teachings in his books. His religious nature evolved from studying St. Thomas Aquinas philosophy on the esthetics. Joyce could not separate religion and writing and made being a non-traditional priest an occupation; eliminating the regular ordination process, the title, and duties of a traditional priest. In A Portrait, Joyce was simply writing a fictional autobiography about his experience in school, but his subconscious reveals that in the beginning of the novel, he had a deep devotion for both art and priesthood, and in the middle and end of the novel reveals several tests he had to partake. As the text deconstructs itself, it reveals an adolescent trying to learn how to serve God as a priest through the art form of writing.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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