• Bottles of ink, and reams of paper: Clotel, Racialization, and the Material Cultue of Print

    Author(s):
    Jonathan Senchyne (see profile)
    Date:
    2012
    Group(s):
    LLC 19th-Century American, LLC African American, MS Visual Culture, TM Book History, Print Cultures, Lexicography
    Subject(s):
    African American literature, American literature, Media studies
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    print culture, book history, early african american, william wells brown, clotel
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M69K5P
    Abstract:
    This essay argues that greater attention to the significance of the material culture of print, especially in early African American print culture, shows how technologies of racialization emerge in conjunction with technologies of printed words and images. The stereotype is perhaps the most familiar case. In one sense it offers quick reproduction of legible text, and in another it of- fers quick reproduction of a legible social type. In the rest of this essay, I ex- amine how another technology of legibility, black/white dualism, structures both print legibility and racial legibility. This essay proposes that the material culture of whiteness in antebellum print culture participates in nineteenth- century racial formation by modeling how whiteness is to be seen while un- seen, providing the structural backdrop against which marks or types become legible.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter
    Pub. DOI:
    10.9783/9780812206296.140
    Publisher:
    University of Pennsylvania Press
    Author/Editor:
    Lara Langer Cohen, Jordan Alexander Stein
    Book Title:
    Early African American Print Culture
    Chapter:
    8
    Start Page:
    140
    End Page:
    158
    Status:
    Published
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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