• “Per omnia saecula saeculorum” or “Inkaba yakho iphi?”: Indigeneity in Alex La Guma and Aidan Higgins

    Author(s):
    James Gifford (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Group(s):
    CLCS 20th- and 21st-Century, LLC 20th- and 21st-Century English and Anglophone, LLC African to 1990, LLC Indigenous Literatures of the United States and Canada, LLC Irish
    Subject(s):
    African literature, Comparative literature, Irish literature, Modern literature, Native American literature
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6JC7J
    Abstract:
    This article argues for an overlapping notion of indigeneity in Alex La Guma's In the Fog of the Seasons' End and Aidan Higgins' Langrishe, Go Down articulated using critical Aboriginal Studies while exploring the materialist emergence of identity. The key tension, then, is not between both authors’ progressive politics nor the real differences between their Irish and South African settings—the tension is the in-betweenness of their shared difficulty articulating a form of indigeneity and artistic expression that does not conflict with a materialist history and the theoretical precepts of their anticolonial visions. This is to say, both La Guma and Higgins work to express a metaphysical localist understanding of indigeneity while retaining the characteristically materialist notions of decolonization of the 1960s. Rather than a faulty logic, this understanding of colonialism and indigeneity is plural and reflects the “in-between” nature of their experiences.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal Article
    Publisher:
    Canadian Comparative Literature Association
    Journal:
    Canadian Review of Comparative Literature / Revue Canadienne de Littérature Comparée
    Volume:
    42
    Issue:
    2
    Start Page:
    171
    End Page:
    189
    Status:
    Published
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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