• Festarbeit, Tafelloge, Zeremonial. Freimaurerei und höfische Gesellschaft

    Author(s):
    Joachim Berger (see profile)
    Date:
    2004
    Group(s):
    Early Modern History, Freemasonry and Masonic Studies, History
    Subject(s):
    Freemasonry, Freemasonry--Rituals, Courts and courtiers, Etiquette, Rites and ceremonies, Goethe, Johann Wolfgang von, 1749-1832
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Initiation, Secrecy, Hierachies, early modern European societies
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/w8w7-0n49
    Abstract:
    Freemasonry has traditionally been seen as a key influence in the rise of the Bourgeoisie, since it allegedly subdued social boundaries and behavioural norms of the Ancien Régime. This paper, however, argues that the masonic lodges at least in the smaller German court towns, adopted various elements of court society – organizational structures, myths and ceremonies. These lodges imported the British model of the gentleman-freemason and combined it with customs and values of the secular orders of knighthood popular at courts. The most important masonic Grand Lodge, the Strict Observance, was ruled by an elitist 'Inner Order' that was modeled after the medieval Knights Templar. These masonic 'Knights' were searching for a new chivalric code. Moreover, the rituals of all lodges mimicked ceremonies at court, culminating in the Tafelloge. Freemasonry thus did not threaten court society. Its utopian potential lay in harmonizing its social and cultural inconsistencies.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

    Downloads

    Item Name: pdf berger_majestas122004_festarbeit.pdf
      Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 85