• Ethical Issues in Revelation

    Author(s):
    Laszlo Istvan Hangyas
    Editor(s):
    Tom de Bruin (see profile)
    Date:
    2022
    Group(s):
    Spes Christiana (journal)
    Subject(s):
    Bible. Revelation
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/79ea-qn44
    Abstract:
    The Apocalypse can be considered a theology of power. This article discusses seven ethical issues related to the use and abuse of dele-gated power/authority (exousia). First and foremost, delegated authority is a relational term with dual-directional aspects. It implies that both humans and heavenly beings are morally responsible creatures. Second, this responsibility includes God-given basic human rights: life, freedom, and dignity. Embedded in these basic rights is resistance when one is confronted by unjust authority. Third, our personal freedom comes with discernment. Humans and heavenly beings are all created by God as free moral agents. Fourth, a seven times reoccurring Greek noun for patient endurance (hupomone) that signifies an active virtue, a courageous perseverance and persistence that cannot be shaken by fear or evil or danger. The fifth ethical issue is unity. In Revelation two opposing powers (good and evil) aim at unity for two completely different reasons and using contrary means. The sixth issue is therefore influence. The seventh ethical is-sue is the certainty of final victory that offers a theology of hope and rewards in every chiastic unit of the Apocalypse.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Scheduled
    Last Updated:
    2 months ago
    License:
    Attribution

    This item will be available for download beginning 06/06/2023