• Indigenous Responses to Climate Change and Water Quality Concerns in the Great Lakes

    Author(s):
    Wenona Singel
    Date:
    2018
    Group(s):
    MSU Law Faculty Repository
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/z4yr-yz15
    Abstract:
    As a citizen of the Little Traverse Bay Band of Odawa Indians in Michigan, I have an indigenous perspective on the governments of the Great Lakes. A recent book2 on climate change in the Great Lakes Region begins with an observation that four critical points must be addressed for effective mitigation and adaptation: * Downscale our understanding of the effects of climate change to understand the local impacts (bring climate change "home"); * Engage expertise on coupled human and natural systems; * Deploy expertise on decision making under uncertainty; and * Link scientific analysis with deliberation. This is interesting because tribal governments are well equipped to do these four things in ways that others are perhaps not. In terms of understanding the local ramifications of a changing climate, tribes are in a unique position with their capacity to collect detailed data regarding local impacts, as a result perhaps of climate change, within their communities. Furthermore, they have the resources and capacity to engage in a deep collection of data regarding changes in water temperatures, changes in habitats, changes in ice formation, changes in precipitation, etc., and impacts on water resources and the ecosystem.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 weeks ago
    License:
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