• Institutional Indifference

    Author(s):
    Nicole Godfrey
    Date:
    2020
    Group(s):
    MSU Law Faculty Repository
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/1c9t-4f98
    Abstract:
    It is no secret that American prisons and jails are often cruel and degrading places to those who are forced to live or choose to work within their walls.' With the current political and social interest in criminal justice reform, intrepid journalists are shedding some light on what goes on behind prison walls.2 But the indignities suffered each day by the nearly 2.2 million people held in American prisons and jails 3 occur largely in the dark, out of the public's critical eye.4 These indignities include lack of access to medical care,' subpar mental health services,6 physical and sexual assaults by prison staff members,7 and a clear disregard for the safety of vulnerable prisoners.8 In theory, however, even without public condemnation of the inhumane conditions of our prisons, incarcerated persons should be protected from cruel conditions under the Eighth Amendment's prohibition on "cruel and unusual punishments."' Regrettably, the reality for prisoners who seek relief from cruel and inhumane conditions is much more complicated.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 weeks ago
    License:
    Attribution
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