• Emergent Neurotechnologies and Challenges to Responsibility Frameworks

    Author(s):
    Laura Cabrera, Jennifer Carter-Johnson
    Date:
    2020
    Group(s):
    MSU Law Faculty Repository
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/s3ve-0451
    Abstract:
    "It is not my fault; it is my brain implant which made me do it." Some scholars have argued that this could become a common strategy: defendants might argue that as the result of a defective brain implant, an autonomous brain implant, or someone hacking into their implant, they should not be held responsible, or at least not fully responsible. In the past few years, a neuroscientific revolution has been underway. Neuroscience has rapidly increased our knowledge of the functioning of the human brain, providing us with an insight into the mental processes underpinning human behavior. This explosion of interest in neuroscience has resulted in the development of many neurofields: from neuroaesthetics to neuroeconomics and neuromarketing. But as we learn more about the brain, we also learn more about human thought and motivations. These new understandings and knowledge about the functioning of the human brain are of great relevance to ethics and law, given that these are disciplines primarily concerned with the normative dimension of human behavior. That is why ethicists and legal scholars have been interested in the impact of neuroscientific advances, resulting in the rapid development of neuroethics 2 and neurolaw.3
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 weeks ago
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