• Attention, Awareness, and Noticing in SLA: A Methodological Review

    Author(s):
    SLS Working Papers (view group) , Jieun Ahn
    Editor(s):
    Mostafa Papi, Ji-Hyun Park
    Date:
    2014
    Group(s):
    SLS Working Papers
    Subject(s):
    Applied linguistics, Second language acquisition
    Item Type:
    Online publication
    Tag(s):
    attention, awareness, Language acquisition, review
    Permanent URL:
    https://doi.org/10.17613/qsvm-vc32
    Abstract:
    Schmidt’s Noticing Hypothesis (1990, 1994, 1995, 2001), which proposes that the process of noticing enables the conversion of input to intake, has been hugely influential and is now “regarded as a mainstream SLA construct” (Yoshioka, Frota, & Bergsleithner, 2013, p. 7). Early studies on noticing mainly involved the issue of whether attention or awareness— and what types—were necessary for L2 learning (Gass, 1997; Leow, 1997, 2000; Robinson, 1995; Schmidt, 1990; Tomlin & Vila, 1994). However, researchers have begun to note that it is important to ascertain how to operationalize and measure noticing for empirical testing (Philp, 2012). Given that L2 learners’ internal cognitive activities are neither directly measureable nor observable, the difficulty we face in measuring noticing is not surprising. Moreover, “the terms noticing, attention, and awareness have lacked in precision” (Gass, Behney, & Plonsky, 2013, p. 266) across studies, resulting in inconsistencies in the measures of noticing. To gain access to learners’ cognitive processes of noticing, online/concurrent measures (e.g., think-alouds, underlining) and off-line/non-concurrent measures (e.g., post-task questionnaires, pretest-posttest, stimulated recall) have been widely used in SLA.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Online publication    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    5 months ago
    License:
    Attribution
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