• बुद्ध ते आंबेडकर अर्थचिंतन

    Author(s):
    Dr. Rakshit Madan Bagde (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Group(s):
    Literature and Economics
    Subject(s):
    Economic history
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    economic justice
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/rcvp-2e14
    Abstract:
    The economic system is the cornerstone of social development. Its economic system has remained at the root of the progressive development of human civilization. A country, society, or caste; Social, political and cultural upliftment is mainly based on the progress of its economic resources and facilities. In a country without these facilities, human society cannot develop its civilization and culture. Meaning has a special place in human life. That is why even now and in the past, meaning is sometimes considered indirectly more important than religion. Gautama Buddha was the first to know this weakness of human nature. While stating that the root of all sorrows is craving, Gautama Buddha has also included materialism in craving. After attaining enlightenment at Sarnath, while giving the first sermon to the Panchparivrajakas, the Buddha says, "There are two poles of human life. The first is the life of luxury and the second is the life of physical suffering. ”One says eat and drink and have fun because tomorrow we will all die. The Buddha rejected both ways of life because, according to him, both ways are unsuitable for human life. He had faith in a middle way. Sorrow is created by the two extremes of superiority and inferiority. There are two extremes in society: the exploited and the exploited, the rich and the poor. People who are branded as inferior are stuck in an inferiority complex. So if society is to be happy, it is necessary to follow the middle way of life.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
    Share this:

    Downloads

    Item Name:pdf बुद्ध-ते-आंबेडकर-अर्थचिंतन.pdf
     Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 5