• Studentischer Konsum in Universitätsstädten des späten Mittelalters. Das Beispiel Leipzig

    Author(s):
    Enno Bünz, Alexander Sembdner (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Subject(s):
    Educational history, Urban history, Economic history
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    Leipzig, University, Late Medieval, Beer, student life, History of Universities, History of consumption
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/jr4e-s463
    Abstract:
    The article explores the question what kind of economical impact late-medieval universities could make on their surrounding cities. By studying the sources for the university of Leipzig (founded in 1409) it can be shown, that despite a proportionately rather high amount of students in the city, the economic impact should not be overestimated. Consumption of beer and other consumables might have boosted the business volume of local markets, but not to such a degree, that cities would profit from universities on a higher scale. On the contrary, late-mediavel univerities could only survive in cities with a thriving market already in place. Where universities really could make an impact was the market for books and prints, especially since the consumption of documents of all forms war always high amdits the student body.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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