• “Glamorous factories of unpredictable freedom”: Care, Coalition, and Hacking Hacking

    Author(s):
    Christina Dunbar-Hester (see profile)
    Date:
    2020
    Group(s):
    Science and Technology Studies (STS)
    Subject(s):
    Science and technology studies (STS), Feminist theory, Gender studies
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    feminist technoscience, Hacker culture, free software, care
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/cjh1-fp66
    Abstract:
    In the early years of the 21st century, as free software communities matured, they began to recognize that their contributor bases were overwhelmingly composed of men. A 2006 European Union policy report revealed that fewer than 2% of free software practitioners were women, which catalyzed attention to these matters (Nafus, Leach, & Krieger, 2006). Many hackers decided that what Grenzfurthner & Schneider (2009) called the “classical nerd scheme”, which has tended to favor men and elites, was insufficient to realize their goals (Dunbar-Hester, 2016; Eglash, 2002). With increasing urgency, groups formed to support individuals defined as “others” in open source and hacking. Significantly, the rough consensus and running code ethos that supported practitioners’ self-organization around technical production was reoriented to hack their communities. These voluntaristic efforts to reconstitute open technology communities are the subject of this chapter.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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