• Americans and Iraq, Twelve Years Apart: Comparing Support for the US Wars in Iraq

    Author(s):
    Dana Williams (see profile)
    Date:
    2013
    Subject(s):
    Sociology of peace, war, and social conflict, Political sociology, Sociology of conflict, Policy sociology, Military sociology
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    public opinion, iraq war, Militarism, terrorism
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/t3kj-z087
    Abstract:
    Significant differences exist in Americans’ support for force between the 1991 Persian Gulf War and 2003 Iraq War, even when holding all demographic variables constant. Nearly every group decreased their support from 1991 to 2003, including men and women, Whites and racial minorities, people with high school degrees or higher, nearly all age categories, and Democrat and Independent affiliated individuals. When examining potential causes for decreased support in the 2003 Iraq War, the “nature of the conflict” presents the strongest argument and evidence. The Persian Gulf War aimed to force the Iraqi army from Kuwait, while the Iraq War was aimed at changing the governmental regime of Iraq. The latter conflict was less socially acceptable than the former to Americans. These differences between the conflicts are the best explanation for the change in support, while other explanations, including the changing composition of the population and a less pro-military populace, are insufficient.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    5 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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