• Continental Divides in an Age of Technology: Unanticipated Consequences of Emigration and Implications for the Economic, Political and SocioCultural Arrangements in the Home Country

    Author(s):
    MYNA GERMAN PADMINI BANERJEE
    Editor(s):
    Jyotirmaya Patnaik (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    Communication Studies, Cultural Studies, Digital Humanists, Feminist Humanities, Film Studies
    Subject(s):
    Mass media, Communication, Journalism, Mass media--Study and teaching, Communication in politics
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Hyper-reality, mass communications and globalization, Media studies, Political communication
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/0k1t-re42
    Abstract:
    This paper reflects an extensive and in-depth review of the literature on the role of hyper-reality in our contemporary lives and its impact on our migratory decisions. Hyper-reality is defined as the somewhat surreal ability to peer into living rooms thousands of miles away using state-of-the-art communication technology such as Skype Examining development issues, one could highlight groups of individuals for whom living conditions have improved substantively back home and who choose not to migrate, based on what they see in the receiving country, in terms of reversal of cultural norms and erosion of traditional values. Or, migrants in the receiving country might choose to turn their attention homeward to take advantage of upbeat economies, viewing the increase in material prosperity firsthand through the new informational communication technologies. The paper includes aspects of material,, including a chapter by Buzzi & Megele on “hyper-reality” in our upcoming co-edited book, an anthology of global writings on migration, technology and transculturation (Lindenwood University Press, 2011). The paper concludes with perspectives on reversing the “brain drain” which has created pockets of wealth in educated new-immigrant communities in the developed world while creating shortages in the developing world. The paper builds on the three conceptual strands in the German & Banerjee co-edited book, starting with material on “digital diasporas” (technology), moving into material on “social networks” and “chains of migration” from certain locations (transculturation or social perspective) to future migration scenarios (as in reversing the “brain drain”).
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved

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