• The Authority of Ulama and the Problem of Anti-State Militancy in Pakistan

    Author(s):
    Muhammad Akram (see profile)
    Date:
    2014
    Group(s):
    Cultural Studies, Islamicate Studies, Religious Studies
    Subject(s):
    Sociology of terrorism, Sociology of peace, war, and social conflict, Peace-building, Religion and violence, Religious studies, Islam
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    terrorism, Taliban, Religious authority, Ulama
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/rag2-zf06
    Abstract:
    Pakistan’s religious leaders, ulama, have been put under significant strain in relation to how to deal with questions about the political tensions and violence over the past decade flowing from the Taliban’s role in the conflict in Afghanistan and Pakistan. The effects of this fraught environment on religious authority can be seen through the way that religious leaders have issued contradictory and opaque fatawa (non-binding, but highly influential, legal opinions). This article particularly considers the way that different fatwa-giving religious groups, such as Deobandis, Brevalis, and Ahl-i-Hadith, have dealt with these problems. The violence, which has struck the heart of Pakistan civil society, has led to a confusing array of fatawa from these religious elites. These opinions have sought to categorize violence as either legitimate or to be condemned. This article, therefore, shows how these fatawa and the conflicting positions they have taken compromised religious authority in contemporary Pakistan.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    4 weeks ago
    License:
    Attribution
    Share this:

    Downloads

    Item Name:pdf authority-of-ulama_and_the_militancy_in_pakistan_akram.pdf
     Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 14