• ‘An Utter Absence of National Feeling’: Australian Women and the International Suffrage Movement, 1900–14

    Author(s):
    James Keating (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    Australia, History, Social movements, Transnationalism, Historiography, Women
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    australia, International Council of Women, International Woman Suffrage Alliance, Vida Goldstein, Australian history, Gender history, Transnational history, Women's history
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/s5an-sc98
    Abstract:
    In February 1902 the Victorian suffragist Vida Goldstein helped establish the International Woman Suffrage Alliance (IWSA) in Washington, D.C. Four months later, the Commonwealth Franchise Act gave white women unprecedented political privileges. Despite these pioneer achievements, Australian women struggled to achieve prominence within the international suffrage movement before the First World War. Discounting traditional explanations that expense and distance kept Australians on the IWSA’s margins, this article reconsiders the concept of national representation – a central tenet of liberal internationalism. In the wake of Federation, deep colonial loyalties persisted and women remained ambivalent about assuming the responsibilities of national and international citizenship.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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