• The Breakup 2.1: The ten-year update

    Author(s):
    Ilana Gershon (see profile)
    Date:
    2020
    Group(s):
    Anthropology
    Subject(s):
    Mass media, History, Digital media, Anthropological linguistics, Mass media--Study and teaching
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    social change, phatic, Media ecology, Media history, New media, Linguistic anthropology, Media studies
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/nwkw-2383
    Abstract:
    Since 2007–2008, American undergraduates’ media ecology has changed dramatically without an accompanying transformation in how they use media to end relationships. The similarities in people’s breakup practices between 2008 and 2018 reveal that, regardless of what social media is used, American undergraduates turn to media in moments of breakup as ways to manage three complicated aspects of ending a relationship: untangling all the ways in which people signal intertwined lives, deciphering the quotidian unknowable of another person’s mind, and trying to control who knows what when. This paper explores how rapid shifts in media ecologies may change the ways in which conventionalization around social practices emerges, leading to more norms oriented around what all media accomplish, rather than generating norms around the affordances of a specific medium.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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