• “Cultures of Suicide? Regionalism and Suicide Verdicts in Medieval England.”

    Author(s):
    Sara Margaret Butler (see profile)
    Date:
    2007
    Group(s):
    British History, Late Medieval History, Legal history, Medical Humanities, Medieval Studies
    Subject(s):
    Late medieval history, Legal history, Medical history, Medieval history, Medieval studies
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/jard-ye77
    Abstract:
    The use of the term “community” in historical studies continues to present problems for many medievalists. Myriad studies have emphasized the inadequacy of the term when describing medieval society. Microstudies of manors and villages, especially in the English context, by historians Barbara A. Hanawalt, J. Ambrose Raftis, and Sherri Olson (among others) have highlighted the sheer variety of experiences within and among the peasantry, reminding us that the “village community” masks a much more complicated and fractious economic and social grouping of people than previously thought.1 “The mystique of the ‘village community’” tends to favor harmony over tension and conflict, thus veiling the reality that the peasantry did not all share the same experience (and for that matter, neither did the gentry, the nobility, or the ecclesiasts). Nevertheless, more recently, this debate over whether or not to use the term “community” seems to have come full circle.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    10 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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