• Iconographic similarities between Permian “goddess plaques” (Ural region, 7-8th centuries CE) and Horus cippi (Egypt, 8th century BCE - 2nd century CE)

    Author(s):
    Lloyd Graham (see profile)
    Date:
    2020
    Group(s):
    Ancient Near East, Assyriologists, Egyptology
    Subject(s):
    Assyriology, Egyptology, Art history, Iconography, Religion
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Permian animal style, Perm bronzes, Horus cippus, Master of Animals, Mistress of Animals
    Permanent URL:
    https://hcommons.org/deposits/item/hc:31277/
    Abstract:
    The iconography of the Horus cippus, an amulet popular in Egypt from the late Third Intermediate Period to Roman times (8th century BCE - 2nd century CE), is unexpectedly recapitulated in bronze “goddess plaques” of the 7-8th centuries CE made by Permian peoples – Finno-Ugric groups from the Ural region of northern Eurasia. The likely explanation is that both templates are descendants of the widely-diffused “Master of Animals” motif, which originated in Mesopotamia during the Ubaid period (6-5th millennium BCE). Transfer of the Master/Mistress of Animals motif from the Near East to the Ural region probably occurred via the Scythians of the 1st millennium BCE.
    Notes:
    Other tags: Egyptian amulet, Mesopotamian amulet, Lamashtu amulet, Scythian, Eurasian steppe, Ural. Eikón Imago 15 = Eikón Imago vol. 9, no. 1.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 month ago
    License:
    Attribution
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