• Structuring Reflection

    Author(s):
    Jason Luther
    Editor(s):
    Elizabeth J. Clark
    Date:
    2020
    Item Type:
    Course Material or learning objects
    Tag(s):
    DPiH, DPiH Assessment, DPih Course Material or learning objects, Practice, Student agency, Iteration, Rubric, Reflection, Digital pedagogy
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/pmkg-n362
    Abstract:
    Curatorial note from Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities: Staging meaningful reflection can be difficult. Jason Luther’s course relied on the use of student grading contracts for summative assessment. At the end of the course, students returned to those contracts, along with a set of prompts provided by the instructor. Students answered questions such as “What goals did you have for this zine and did you meet them?” and “What was your vision and how was it compromised by these tool and technologies?” These reflective questions engage students in a conversation about their own expectations and the results they achieved with their zines in a helpful analysis of the end product. Luther’s assignment demonstrates the intentional use of guided questions to prompt self-assessment. This is a particularly useful strategy when students engage with new media technology; helping them to articulate what they have learned and what skills and knowledge they have integrated into their project.
    Notes:
    This deposit is part of Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities. Digital Pedagogy in the Humanities is a peer-reviewed, open-access publication edited by Rebecca Frost Davis, Matthew K. Gold, Katherine D. Harris, and Jentery Sayers, and published by the Modern Language Association. https://digitalpedagogy.hcommons.org/.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 years ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial
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