• Quantitative Data, Hypothesis Testing, and Archaeological Narratives: Was there really a Greek Dark Age?

    Author(s):
    Sarah C. Murray (see profile)
    Date:
    2020
    Item Type:
    Conference proceeding
    Conf. Title:
    1st Conference on Computer Applications and Quantitative Methods in Archaeology Greek Chapter
    Conf. Org.:
    CAA-GR
    Conf. Loc.:
    Rethymno
    Conf. Date:
    2014
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/emsw-2y40
    Abstract:
    This paper assesses the increasingly common view that the Greek “Dark Age” is a scholarly construct by determining whether the rate of discovery of Early Iron Age sites has increased since the discovery of Lefkandi around 1980. I present a database of over 4,000 Late Bronze Age and Protogeometric sites discovered between 1900 and 2010. If Early Iron Age sites were being systematically ignored in the early 20th century, but treated fairly in the last few decades, we would expect the annual rate of Protogeometric site discovery to increase after 1980 in a way that diverges from the rate of discovery of Bronze Age sites. However, the data show that the rates of discovery for the two periods normalize very well, to roughly 1:1 over the whole data set. This data suggests that the poverty of the Early Iron Age cannot be explained as the result of scholars ignoring the evidence.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Conference proceeding    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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