• None is (Still) Too Many: Holocaust Commemoration and Historical Anesthetization

    Author(s):
    Alana Vincent (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Group(s):
    Sheffield Institute for Interdisciplinary Biblical Studies
    Subject(s):
    Holocaust, Genocide studies, Cultural memory
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    refugee, antisemitism, holocaust education
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/y62a-bb91
    Abstract:
    Institutionalized Holocaust commemoration in IHRA member states very often serves to mask problematic policies by offering reassurance that the Holocaust was perpetrated in another place, at another time, by other people. Rote commemoration runs the risk of moral anesthetization, and the further removed the original event becomes in place and time, the more difficult its lessons are to transfer to the present day. At worst, Holocaust memory feeds into a narrative of national exceptionalism, in which the capacity to commit, or to be complicit in, genocide becomes the unique attribute of enemy states, and a nation’s own record of intervention, however poor, is obscured from reflective scrutiny.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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