• La nuit genrée ou l’obscure clarté des scènes anglaises

    Author(s):
    Yan Brailowsky (see profile)
    Date:
    2015
    Group(s):
    Renaissance / Early Modern Studies, Shakespeare
    Subject(s):
    Drama, Early modern drama, Shakespeare, Performance, Early modern performance studies
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    night
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/xd1p-mr65
    Abstract:
    Gendered night, or the nocturnal brightness of the early modern English stage In French, critics speak of the night using feminine terms, but the term is grammatically neutral in English. Despite this neutrality, night may be gendered. In Romeo and Juliet, virgins hide their shame from their lovers by hiding in the dark. If night is consecrated for love games, it is also a time for death. In Macbeth, Satan acts in media nocte, and Lady Macbeth calls on night and the « ministers of hell » to murder in secret. Carpe noctem. This paper will discuss the different loci used in Elizabethan and early Jacobean drama, as well as the different literary genres, to describe the rich variety of the plays’ gendered nocturnal landscapes. The Shakespearean « gendered » night may prove more revealing than plain daylight.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 week ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial
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