• An Instruction Manual Would Be Perfect!

    Author(s):
    Alicia Colson FRGS (see profile)
    Date:
    2019
    Group(s):
    Archaeology, Digital Humanists, Ethnomusicology
    Subject(s):
    Anthropology, North America, Semiotics, Linguistics
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Rock Art (Archaeology), Archaeological Method & Theory, Algonquian, Shamanism
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/47xt-6x82
    Abstract:
    The Algonquian-speaking peoples create, used, and made images which are subdivided into three groups. These images were occurred on a variety of objects to communicate information, meanings. It is known that only the Midé, their ritual and medicinal specialists (shaman), used a specific group of these images, those on birch bark scrolls. Four birchbark scrolls were examined using the same techniques that were applied to the pictograph sites (rock art sites) of Lake of the Woods to establish whether images should be understood as groups or individual elements as they serve as an illustration to counterpoint the pictograph sites.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    10 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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