• Dialogue between absentees? Liberation radio engages its audiences, Namibia, 1978-1989

    Author(s):
    Robert Heinze (see profile)
    Date:
    2019
    Group(s):
    African History
    Subject(s):
    Southern Africa, Propaganda
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Radio, Audience and reception studies
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/k5y9-8292
    Abstract:
    Liberation radios, the propaganda stations operated by the anti-Apartheid and anticolonial movements Southern Africa, provide us with a unique lens on the relationship between broadcasters and their audiences. Most importantly, they conceptualized audiences in a specific, two-pronged way to mobilize target populations and influence global media publics. Going beyond ideas of ‘propaganda’ and circulation of media content, this article uses oral history interviews with broadcasters from the Namibian ‘Voice of Namibia’ to analyze the way broadcasters thought about and spoke to wider audiences, which included media institutions and cultural production circulating content to audiences beyond direct listeners to their station. It argues that liberation radios’ relationship with their audiences can be usefully analyzed taking theoretical models from community media research, such as the ‘rhizome’ approach that emphasizes a multiplicity of connections between media and the communities they serve.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 years ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives
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