• Lysiak Rudnytsky’s prescience: Ukraine’s political turbulence and trauma of a “non-historical” nation

    Author(s):
    Ostap Kushnir (see profile)
    Date:
    2019
    Group(s):
    Anthropology, Cultural Studies, Soviet and Russian history and culture
    Subject(s):
    Ukraine, Ukrainian history, Nationalism studies, Postcolonial culture, Identity
    Item Type:
    Online publication
    Tag(s):
    identity politics, Identity Theory, post-communism, post-colonial, political activism
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/945r-ct82
    Abstract:
    If we look at the past three decades in the history of Eastern Europe, Ukraine may safely be placed at the top of the chart of “unstable” states. First was the student-led Revolution on Granite in the 1990s. The outcome of that revolution was a resignation of entrenched high-ranked Soviet officials under the pressure of public opinion. Then, if we skip the 1999 anti-Kuchma protests, the next big upheaval was the Orange Revolution in 2003–04. It led to a rerun of the presidential election and eventual reboot of the government. Finally, the massive and blood-soaked EuroMaidan, or Revolution of Dignity, happened in 2013–14—which, once again, led to a drastic change in Ukraine’s ruling elites. All three revolutions were of unprecedented regional magnitude and became a factor in the foreign policy of the EU, Russia, and the US.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Online publication    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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