• "Human and Animal Generation in Renaissance Medical Debates," in: Human and Animal Cognition in Early Modern Philosophy and Medicine, ed. Roberto Lo Presti et al. (Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh University Press, 2017), 89-98.

    Author(s):
    Hiro Hirai (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Subject(s):
    History of science, History of medicine, History of philosophy, Renaissance studies, Intellectual history
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/44fe-wg27
    Abstract:
    In this paper I will address the question of the origin of the soul and the intellect in human and animal generation, as it appeared in medical debates of the sixteenth and early seventeenth centuries. How did this issue affect the traditional boundary firmly established between human beings and animals? How was the passage of Aristotle’s "Generation of Animals," 2.3, used in this context? To answer these questions, I will focus on the embryological discussion of three representative figures of diverse geographical, intellectual and confessional backgrounds: Jean Fernel of Paris, Jacob Schegk of Tübingen and Daniel Sennert of Wittenberg. Contents 1. Introduction 2. Jean Fernel 3. Jacob Schegk 4. Daniel Sennert 5. Conclusion
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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