• Review Philosophy in Colonial India ed. by Sharad Deshpande

    Author(s):
    Narasimhananda Swami (see profile)
    Date:
    2019
    Group(s):
    Philosophy
    Subject(s):
    India, Philosophy, South Asia, Colonial history, Colonial discourse
    Item Type:
    Book review
    Tag(s):
    Indian philosophy, India Studies
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/kmr4-v333
    Abstract:
    India has been the seat of deep philosophical engagements since the Vedic period. However, Indian philosophical wisdom, albeit different from Western philosophical in many respects, was not widely known to the rest of the world before colonial thinkers started their dialogue with Indian philosophy through their translations and academic exegeses. Western scholars, primarily the Indologists, analyzed Indian thought through the lens of Western thought in spite of the traditional insular approach of Indian pandits. Amidst this tension between traditional Indian scholars and Western scholars, who encountered Indian philosophy, was born a unique breed of Indian scholars, thanks to the colonial milieu of education and thought, who developed their thought in the intersection of traditional Indian thought and Western thought. Some of these scholars looked down at Indian thought, some held Indian thought to be greater than that of the rest of the world, and some tried to develop syncretic approaches to philosophy with an in-depth understanding of both Indian and Western philosophies. Thus, cross-cultural philosophy began in India. Philosophy in Colonial India traces this development of cross-cultural philosophy in India and documents the tensions between interpretations of Indian and Western philosophical systems.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book review    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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