• Maitland's Moment: Turning Nova Scotia’s Forests into Ships for the Global Commodity Trade in the Mid-Nineteenth Century

    Author(s):
    Judy Burns, Jim Clifford (see profile) , Thomas Peace
    Date:
    2016
    Subject(s):
    Environmental history, Global history, Canadian history, HGIS
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    Nova Scotia
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/21cn-2q84
    Abstract:
    The intersection of local environments and global mobility transformed Maitland, Nova Scotia, and many other small villages on the Bay of Fundy into boomtowns between the 1860s and the 1880s. Maitland’s location at the mouth of a river flowing into the Bay of Fundy, along with an abundant supply of spruce and a growing global demand for the low-cost transportation provided by large wooden sailing ships, facilitated the rising economic importance of this village and the region. Unlike other products that galvanized much of the Canadian extractive economy in the nineteenth century, Maitland’s spruce trees were not shipped to Britain as raw lumber. Instead, local businessmen and labourers transformed them into inexpensive sailing ships for transporting bulk commodities around the globe. Maitland’s rise as a shipbuilding centre coincided with a golden age of resource-led global economic development.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives
    Share this:

    Downloads

    Item Name:pdf moving_natures_2016_chapter01.pdf
     Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 5