• Roman collecting and the biographies of Egyptian Late Period statues

    Author(s):
    Henry Colburn (see profile)
    Date:
    2016
    Group(s):
    Ancient Greece & Rome, Ancient Near East, Archaeology, Classical archaeology, Roman archaeology
    Subject(s):
    Egyptology, Persia, Roman archaeology, Near Eastern archaeology
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/k5vr-j038
    Abstract:
    Studies of Egyptian Late Period statuary often assume that the extant corpus is a representative sample of the artistic output of the Twenty-Sixth to Thirty-First Dynasties (c. 664–332 BCE). This assumption ignores the various human processes that affect the survival of statues after their initial dedication. In particular, the Roman practice of collecting Egyptian naophorous statues for reuse in cult spaces of Egyptian gods in Italy has skewed the chronological distribution of the corpus in favour of statues of Twenty-Sixth Dynasty date. This in turn informs perceptions of the Twenty-Seventh Dynasty, the period of Achaemenid rule in Egypt, as being a time of artistic poverty. This paper examines the biographies of Egyptian statues in order to better distinguish between the products of ancient agency and modern scholarly constructs.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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