• Rethinking administration and seal use in third millennium Crete

    Author(s):
    Maria Relaki (see profile)
    Date:
    2009
    Group(s):
    Aegean and Eastern Mediterranean archaeology, Archaeology
    Subject(s):
    Bronze Age, Administration, Material culture, Kinship, Aegean prehistoric archaeology, Identity, Community
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    material symbolism
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/8rw3-w865
    Abstract:
    The specific outlook and reach of administration in Prepalatial Crete is the topic of heated debate. The materials most frequently implicated in this debate are clay sealings, usually taken as a clear demonstration of administrative concerns. However, although early sealings might have been used for this purpose, this view tends to be influenced by ourknowledge of sealing practices from later, palatial contexts. This paper argues that in order to address such issues we need to explore both the theoretical underpinnings of the concept of administration and sealing practices within their social context. This entails re-assessing the types of sealings found, their contexts of use and deposition and their relationship with Prepalatial seals. I suggest that the ‘administrative’ practices of Prepalatial Cretan society were forged through an interplay between communal and personal strategies that were intimately connected to an ideology of the ‘house’, seen as a unit of corporate affiliation and identification in the Levi-Straussian tradition.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    6 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives
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