• Access, Computational Analysis, and Fair Use in the Digitized Nineteenth- Century Press

    Author(s):
    Paul Fyfe (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Group(s):
    LLC Victorian and Early-20th-Century English, TC Digital Humanities, TM Book History, Print Cultures, Lexicography
    Subject(s):
    Digital archiving, Copyright, Periodicals, Book digitization, Open access
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/1t0e-ex11
    Abstract:
    This essay looks to the near history of copyright, commercially licensed resources, and fair use that shapes digital scholarship on nineteenth-century periodicals today. Using the digitization of British Library newspapers as a case study, I demonstrate how arguments about access to public domain materials do not fully account for the complex international landscape of rights and exceptions for digital periodicals resources. This landscape is also changing with the emergence of legal exceptions for computational research methods like text and data mining. These methods may point to new forms of scholarly communication, particularly "transformative uses" that work around the restrictive vestiges of copyright law. Ultimately, this essay claims that scholars need to understand the changing parameters of copyright, not simply as a set of rules that affects their day-to-day work but as an opportunity to shape the law and advocate for creative forms of research and scholarly communication.
    Notes:
    Part of a special issue of Victorian Periodicals Review on Copyright Law and Publishing Practice in the Nineteenth-Century Press, edited by Will Slauter. The author of the article has retained copyright.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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