• Disrupting Labor in the Digital Humanities; or, The Classroom Is Not Your Crowd

    Author(s):
    Spencer Keralis (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Group(s):
    Computer Studies in Language and Literature, Digital Humanities, TM Libraries and Research
    Subject(s):
    Digital humanities, Digital pedagogy, Critical pedagogy
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    labor ethics, student rights, Student Labor
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/ggcw-8876
    Abstract:
    Digital humanists have a labor problem, but it’s not what you might think. In this chapter, I describe the problem of student labor in digital humanities as I see it, and examine some of the structural issues that drive the use of student labor. I place the labor economy of digital humanities projects within the broader context of the innovation economy writ large to demonstrate how labor within the academy cannot operate under the same system of consensual participation which informs movements like crowdsourcing and crowdfunding. And in conclusion, I offer suggestions for how ethically managed student labor in the classroom can empower students to demonstrate both CV-ready skills and humanistic knowledge in durable products for which they receive full credit.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    8 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike
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