• Belford's Divergence: or, is industrial archaeology relevant in an AONB?

    Author(s):
    Katy Whitaker (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Group(s):
    Archaeology
    Subject(s):
    Archaeology, History, Environmental history, Landscape
    Item Type:
    Abstract
    Tag(s):
    AONB, industrial archaeology, landscape archaeology, social inclusion, Development
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/77kd-6j50
    Abstract:
    This is a visual abstract for a conference paper at the Theoretical Archaeology Group conference 2018 (Chester). The convener of the conference session 'Steaming Plant or Steam Punk? Researching Industrial Archaeology and Heritage in the 21st Century', Mike Nevell, referred to the conference (2008) and published volume (2009) ‘Crossing Paths or Sharing Tracks? Future directions in the archaeological study of post-1550 Britain and Ireland’. Mike asked participants to consider, how relevant or understood is industrial archaeology and heritage in the second decade of the 21st century? The session also considered barriers to engagement in industrial archaeology, and asked if archaeologists have moved beyond simply recording data towards providing explanations for industrialisation, amongst other questions. My paper looked back to Paul Belford's article of ten years ago, given at that conference and published in 2009, in which Paul called for industrial archaeologists to apply their research to pressing present-day issues including pollution, population movement, the consequences of colonialism and capitalism, for example. In response to both Paul's paper and Mike's invitation, I looked at the relevance of industrial archaeology to the twenty-first century by focussing on rural landscapes, and specifically Areas of Outstanding Natural Beauty.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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