• The Creaturely Modernism of Amos Tutuola

    Author(s):
    Matthew Omelsky (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Group(s):
    LLC African to 1990, TC Postcolonial Studies
    Subject(s):
    Modernism, African literature, Novel criticism, 20th-century anglophone literature
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/3h5q-b827
    Abstract:
    This article examines the global African modernism of Amos Tutuola through the lens of his nonhuman folkloric creatures. Though the work of the early Nigerian novelist is often characterized as modernism’s inversion, or “traditional,” Tutuola in fact articulates a succession of surreal monsters in The Palm Wine Drinkard (1952) and My Life in the Bush of Ghosts (1954) that literally embody commodities and technologies, rupturing the trite image of an insular, primitive Africa. With televisions for hands and footballs for eyes, Tutuola’s modern creatures situate West Africa as a global nexus of social relation, consumer culture, and commodity flows.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    7 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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