• Enlivened City: Inclusive Design, Biopolitics, and the Philosophy of Liveability

    Author(s):
    Aimi Hamraie (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Group(s):
    Critical Disability Studies, Environmental Humanities, Medical Humanities
    Subject(s):
    Critical disability studies, Design theory, Critical geography
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6KK94C08
    Abstract:
    Shortly after the United States announced its withdrawal from the Paris climate accords, mayors of global cities committed to addressing climate change via urban-scale projects aimed at promoting liveable, sustainable, and healthy communities. While such projects are taken for granted as serving the common good, this paper addresses the ideological dimensions of planning liveable cities with health promotion in mind. Liveability, I argue, is a normative ideology wherein liveliness and activation perform aff ective roles, associating urban design methods with feel-good imagined futures while rendering built structures as polemics against disabled and racialized populations. Using Nashville, Tennessee, a mid-sized US city, as a case study, the paper parses the progressive vision of the liveable city from the ideologies, political economies, and development practices that simultaneously activate some lives while excluding others.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    10 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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