• Dissecting Digital Divides: Teaching, Writing, and Making Knowledge of the Mediterranean Past

    Author(s):
    William Caraher (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Subject(s):
    Teaching and learning in higher education, History
    Item Type:
    Conference paper
    Conf. Title:
    Digital Approaches to Teaching the Ancient Mediterranean
    Conf. Org.:
    Institute for the Study of the Ancient World
    Conf. Loc.:
    New York City
    Conf. Date:
    October 26. 2018
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6HT2GB60
    Abstract:
    This paper considers the impact of so-called digital divides in digital approaches to teaching about the Ancient and Medieval worlds. My experience mostly derives from teaching a large (150+ student) introductory level “Western Civilization” class at the University of North Dakota. UND is a mid-sized, “High Research Activity” university (according to our Carnegie classification) that draws heavily from the Northern Plains. I teach in small history department of 10 students with relatively strong commitment to undergraduate teaching and a small and withering graduate program. This paper explores how various “digital divides” have shaped my own teaching strategies in an introductory level history course and how working to bridge these divides on a practical level nudged me to think more critically about how digital tools produce students, teachers, and communicate the expectations of the modern world.
    Metadata:
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    9 months ago
    License:
    Attribution
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