• In Memoriam: Memory and Imitation in Augustine and Athanasius

    Author(s):
    Zachary B. Smith (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Subject(s):
    Asceticism, Augustine, Late Antiquity, Memory, Monasticism
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Athanasius, imitation
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6BC3SW86
    Abstract:
    Compositions moved Augustine, and nowhere is that more evident than in his Confessions. I argue that in this late-fourth-century biography-cum-protreptic, Augustine tries to replace earlier philosophical (Cicero’s Hortensius) and Christian (Athanasius’s Vita Antonii) protreptics with an updated version – his Confessions, which, in part, seeks to move the reader to embrace the Christian ascetic life. Augustine accomplishes his goal by modeling Confessions partly on the memory-imitation-text triad found in the Vita Antonii. The memory of stories and texts serves as a major focus of the account of his conversion experience in the garden in Milan, and he chooses to imitate those stories as the response to the call to embrace the Christian life. Imitation, in turn, leads him to asceticism through reading Scripture and remembering to imitate others who imitated Antony.
    Notes:
    Supplement titled Augustine on Heart and Life: Essays in Memory of William Harmless, S.J. Edited by John J. O'Keefe and Michael Cameron. URL: http://moses.creighton.edu/JRS/toc/SS15.html
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    2 years ago
    License:
    Attribution
    Share this:

    Downloads

    Item Name:pdf memory-and-imitation-in-aug-and-ath-2018.pdf
     Download View in browser
    Activity: Downloads: 160