• TABOO FOODS OF WORLD WAR II: HOW HORSES FOUND THEIR WAY FROM THE RANGE TO THE PLATE

    Author(s):
    Clelly Johnson
    Editor(s):
    Kreg Abshire (see profile)
    Date:
    2018
    Subject(s):
    American cultural studies, Animal studies, Food studies
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    horsemeat
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M69W08Z4P
    Abstract:
    In the 1930s and 40s, young American children flocked to the cinema to witness their idols thwart dastardly deeds, from halting train robbers to saving the ranch. These cowboys did not achieve their brave acts alone: some had sidekicks, but all had the aid of their trusty steeds. Silver, Trigger, Thunder and Buttermilk were the equine heroes whose names still reverberate in the American zeitgeist. However, when bombs began to fall over Europe, many Americans were forced to see horses in a new way – as dinner. Beef shortages due to rationing brought horsemeat to American tables. This new protein was controversial; many Americans objected to eating it, whether for religious reasons or because they felt distaste at the prospect of eating a cowboy’s companion.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    11 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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