• NABOKOV AS ECOCRITIC: THE PARADOX OF THE HYPERREAL IN LOLITA

    Author(s):
    Melissa R Sande
    Editor(s):
    Kreg Abshire (see profile)
    Date:
    2017
    Subject(s):
    American cultural studies, American literature after 1800, Ecocriticism
    Item Type:
    Article
    Tag(s):
    Lolita, nabokov
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6R20RW2C
    Abstract:
    In spite of the author’s claim that he has nothing to teach readers or critics, Vladimir Nabokov’s masterpiece has been read from innumerable angles. While he affirms in the Afterword to Lolita, “I happen to be the kind of author who in starting to work on a book has no other purpose than to get rid of that book,” critics have examined the novel’s essential critique of American culture over and over (311).[1] Given Nabokov’s strong opinions about social and moral issues, as Dana Brand has observed, “it is hard to believe that these opinions do not manifest themselves in…his most comprehensive representation of modern American life” (14). Working from this assumption, one may use an ecocritical analysis of Lolita to reveal the direct correlation between the depiction of a decaying landscape and American cultural criticism. Further, perceived ruination of the environment in the novel can be framed to trace Humbert’s transition from aestheticism to the hyperreality of consumerism. Humbert’s quest to possess Dolores, then, proffers a troubling metaphor of the annihilation of nature by consumerist culture.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    10 months ago
    License:
    Attribution-NonCommercial
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