• Bakhtin and the Ideal Ruler in 1-2 Chronicles and the Cyropaedia

    Author(s):
    Christine Mitchell (see profile)
    Date:
    2005
    Subject(s):
    Hebrew bible, Ancient Greek historiography, Chronicles
    Item Type:
    Essay
    Tag(s):
    Xenophon
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6JQ0SV1J
    Abstract:
    When we turn to a study of ancient Hebrew narrative, most readers prefer the engaging and artful narratives of Samuel and Kings to the seemingly plodding and pedantic narrative of Chronicles. Recently, however, Chronicles has enjoyed a minor surge of interest. As plodding and pedantic as Chronicles may be, perhaps as boring as Chronicles may be, it is plodding, pedantic, and boring for interesting reasons. It may be instructive to compare the narrative of Chronicles to the narrative of Xenophon’s Cyropaedia, also known as ‘one of the most tedious books to have survived classical antiquity’ (Gera 1993, vii). In this essay, I propose to do exactly that.
    Notes:
    unedited ms.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    3 years ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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