• Historicity, achronicity, and the materiality of cultures in colonial Brazil

    Author(s):
    Amy Buono
    Date:
    2015
    Group(s):
    Global & Transnational Studies, Latin America and the Caribbean, Latin American Art, Renaissance / Early Modern Studies
    Subject(s):
    Art history, Brazilian cultural studies, Colonialism and culture, Historiography of art, Latin American cultural studies
    Item Type:
    Article
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M69S1KJ9S
    Abstract:
    Much of the visual and material culture of colonial Brazil has been omitted from scholarly accounts because it falls outside the familiar repertoire of art historical forms and materials, and also defies categorization by cultural origin and period style. Turning especially to Michael Werner and Bénédicte Zimmermann’s notion of histoire croisée (intercrossed history), this article examines the methodological implications of incorporating such uncomfortable art objects into scholarly accounts by attending to three disparate kinds of artifacts especially characteristic of colonial Brazil: Tupinambá featherwork, Portuguese Atlantic mandinga bags, and architectural tilework. Each of these exemplifies the complex, transcultural processes that take place within colonial contexts, transgressing cultural, religious, and linguistic boundaries, and moving across continents, oceans, and centuries.
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Journal article    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    1 year ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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