• 'A gente Anglorum appellatur: The Evidence of Bede's Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum for the Replacement of Roman Names by English Ones During the Early Anglo-Saxon Period

    Author(s):
    Alaric Hall (see profile)
    Date:
    2011
    Subject(s):
    Anglo-Saxon studies, Roman Empire
    Item Type:
    Book chapter
    Tag(s):
    Bede, Historia ecclesiastica gentis anglorum, Placenames, Toponymy
    Permanent URL:
    http://dx.doi.org/10.17613/M6F47GT17
    Abstract:
    'A gente Anglorum appellatur: The Evidence of Bede’s Historia ecclesiastica gentis Anglorum for the Replacement of Roman Names by English Ones During the Early Anglo-Saxon Period' argues that Bede's Historia ecclesiastica contains unnoticed evidence for the processes of transition from Roman to Anglo-Saxon toponymy in early Anglo-Saxon England. Bede uses two different formulas to specify that place-names are English: a gente Anglorum appellatur (‘called by the people of the English’) and lingua Anglorum (‘in the language of the English’). The first phrase is used exclusively of places whose English names show phonetic continuity with Roman ones; the second with a more heterogeneous group which mostly does not show phonetic continuity. This demands explanation. The explanation suggested here is that major places (likely to be spoken of throughout a whole gens) enjoyed greater stability of nomenclature than minor ones.
    Notes:
    Terminology and Lexicography Research and Practice, 14
    Metadata:
    Published as:
    Book chapter    
    Status:
    Published
    Last Updated:
    10 months ago
    License:
    All Rights Reserved
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